“My disciplinary decision led the public to question our sincerity, our commitment, and whether we understood the toll that domestic violence inflicts on so many families. I take responsibility both for the decision and for ensuring that our actions in the future properly reflect our values,” Goodell wrote. “I didn’t get it right.

Blockers One of the two surprise comedy hit of the year (both critically and commercially) closed this week to a good $59.8M domestic and $92.7M worldwide on a budget of $21M. The film about parents trying to stop their teen girls from losing their virginity on prom night has the kind of old outdated premise long forgotten in Hollywood and notably the script (originally called Cherries) had been passed around for years because of it. By all accounts director Kay Cannon saved the film by wisely putting more focus on the teen girls and giving them more relatable modern problems like sexual identity and the concepts of consent.

I’ve asked a number of people within NPR for an explanation and got conflicting answers. Among them: NPR has a lean staff and extra money was not put into the politics budget when it was being assembled. Michael Oreskes, NPR’s head of news, said a decision was made to focus energies and resources elsewhere (see his comments below).

I don’t use Powershell but work with Linux so my listing of programming skills would be Python/Shell/Chef. My skills in Python are fundamental, which means I can write short scripts and debug to help me at work. Since this is hard to describe during an interview I would mention my projects and also include my github repo.

The couple’s house now backs up on an almost solid lake of ashy muck. Tom Vereb says it makes him think of the aftermath of the Mount St. Helens eruption, with uprooted trees poking out of the sludge. Another story Clemens can’t get straight: 1986 Clemens gave himself the hook in the game, telling manager John McNamara, “That’s all I can pitch.” Clemens later informs the press: “My blister was at a point where I couldn’t finish off my slider. I didn’t want to hang my slider and jeopardize the team. But I thought I did my job.” .

The study from Airwars, a London based watchdog group, and New America, a Washington based think tank, examined the outcome of 2,158 strikes conducted since September 2012 by at least seven local and international actors, underscoring the fraught and fractured nature of post revolution Libya.After a NATO led air campaign helped Libyans topple Gaddafi in 2011, the country has descended into a simmering civil conflict that included the establishment of rival Libyan governments and the rise of militant groups, including a virulent local branch of the Islamic State, that have taken advantage of ungoverned areas to grow strong.The report, which The Washington Post obtained ahead of its release this week, is the first comprehensive examination of the death toll caused by air operations in Libya’s post revolution period.Using social media accounts and other sources to assess individual incidents, researchers concluded that at least 237 and as many as 387 civilians were killed in those strikes. At least another 324 civilians were wounded in those attacks, the report found.While the civilian death toll appears to be far smaller than that caused by Western air operations against militants in Iraq and Syria, one important feature of the Libyan conflict has been its murky, mysterious nature.According to Airwars and New America, strikes have been repeatedly conducted in Libya not only by rival local factions and the United States, but also, with far less transparency, France, the United Arab Emirates and Egypt. But fewer than 50 percent of reported strikes have been publicly declared, leading to questions about responsibility and accountability when civilian deaths do occur.