It exactly that promotion of martial philosophy within Sikh thinking that I personally see as a major issue. To be clear, I not talking about the fundamental principles behind the Khalsa and the obligation to fight injustice, but instead the cultural shift in understanding that rationalizes violence in pursuit of increasingly partisan views of “justice.” We all familiar with the Zafarnama here, as well as the legends of Guru Gobind Singh, but he never initiated violence in order to further his agenda. The precepts of Dharam Yudh even state that revenge is an unacceptable motivation for violent action (and it hard to definitively state that the assassination was the only means left to prevent tyrannical oppression)..

Even though I regret that habit and a large part of those years of my life, I still miss doing that. Anyway, with my high tolerance I would need to smoke a fair amount to feel considerably high, so I must have had a couple bowls in a row upstairs in my room. After I finished and was absolutely ripped, I started walking downstairs to go make some food or something, thinking about whatever nonsense was in my head, and suddenly halfway down the stairs I heard a voice.

But I am not sure there is a word in the English language to describe how I felt when I read that Comey had occasionally used his personal Gmail account to conduct official business. I’d felt the same sense of outrage and helplessness when I heard members of the press lament the outsized attention Clinton’s emails got during the campaign. I won’t re litigate the coverage of Clinton’s emails here (and how I believe suspicion of the motivations of a woman seeking power is at the root of the email controversy), but I can’t help but wonder we don’t now distrust Comey’s the way people distrusted Clinton.

And they know that if Assad does come back into their areas, they’re not necessarily going to survive. They’re fighting for their lives. And when they see this group come along that’s got arms, money and weapons and resources that the moderates have never had, it’s very tempting for them to join that group and fight for their survival..

When I got a call from Tricia Mayer, Director of Online Engagement for Microsoft Research, asking if I’d be interested in hosting a new podcast about the most enigmatic division at Microsoft, I was elated. These were the very people I had always wanted to talk to and now I had the opportunity to interview them in person, for the rest of the world to hear as well. Eric Horvitz is as passionate as he is accomplished.