Here’s the idea: Party institutions are vital in reaching voters and getting citizens involved in campaigns. Vandewalker and Weiner argue that the formal party committees are better for democracy because they have strong electoral incentives to be responsive to the broadest set of citizens possible. Historically, they’ve worked to engage citizens in volunteering, attending party events and, most important, voting..

Then Kathy Rushlow said that not adjectives, is a good rule to keep in mind. Her comment reminded me of what one of my first editors did 30 or so years ago as he butchered improved my copy. He hated adverbs that ended in and killed every one. Mullen’s mink were surprisingly large and healthy looking twice the weight of their wild counterparts, with broad, curious faces. They were, of course, also doomed. I had arrived to see the killing.

The White House previously said it would not fight a court ruling ordering the release of the pictures.Speaking outside the White House, Mr Obama said he would not tolerate the abuse of prisoners.However, he had, he said, directed his legal team to fight the court ordered release of the photos because he was concerned they might “inflame anti American opinion and put our troops in greater danger”.The Pentagon had not sought to conceal anything, he added, and appropriate action had been taken against individuals involved in abuses. The president had been advised against publication by Defence Secretary Robert Gates, Centcom commander Gen David Petraeus and the commander of US forces in Iraq, Gen Ray Odierno, a Pentagon official said.The ACLU said the president’s “decision not to release the photographs makes a mockery of President Obama’s promise of transparency and accountability”.”It’s absolutely essential that these photos be released so the public can examine for itself the torture and abuse that was conducted in its name,” ACLU attorney Amrit Singh said.The human rights group Amnesty International also criticised the president’s decision, saying human beings had been “tortured and denied basic rights”.But the switch was welcomed by Senator Lindsey Graham, a Republican, and Senator Joe Lieberman, an independent.”The fact that the president reconsidered the decision is a strength not a weakness,” they said in a joint statement.The BBC’s Richard Lister in Washington says that although President Obama has insisted on the need for open government, it appears that on this issue he has been persuaded that for now at least such transparency risks doing more harm than good.US MEDIA REACTIONS TO OBAMA’S DECISIONThe photos of abuse at Abu Ghraib did aid our enemies and put the lives of US soldiers at risk. We can assume that another round of photos would have had the same effect.